Welcome, visitor! [ Register | Login


rentwithpetscanada


Post Free Listing

A Legal Victory for Endangered Animals in Ontario!

Animal Justice May 8, 2018

Last fall, you may remember that Animal Justice filed a lawsuit to protect the mountain lion, northern bobwhite, and dozens of other threatened and endangered species in the province of Ontario. Represented by lawyers from Ecojustice, we were concerned that the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry was failing to meet its legal obligations to issue recovery strategies for animals at risk of imminent extinction.

Today, we’re happy to announce that Animal Justice and the Ministry have reached a settlement in the case. The Ministry will now begin providing public updates on its progress to develop recovery strategies for 37 at-risk species—including the mountain lion, northern bobwhite bird, black redhorse fish, gypsy cuckoo bumble bee, and other mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and plants.

This is a huge win for species at risk in the province. Recovery strategies provide scientific advice on how to ensure that healthy numbers of each species return to Ontario. As part of the settlement agreement, the Ministry will also create and release a timetable on the next steps toward creating recovery strategies for the 37 species at risk who are named in the lawsuit. The timetable will be updated every three months with the Ministry’s latest progress.

The world is in the midst of a global extinction crisis of epic proportions. As Ontario’s Endangered Species Act recognizes, animal species are disappearing from the planet at an alarming rate due to human activities.

Ironically, the decimation of wild animal populations is being driven by breeding and confining domesticated animals on industrial farms, then slaughtering them for human consumption. Scientists have singled out animal agriculture as a leading contributor to global species extinction due to the massive greenhouse gas emissions associated with raising animals, meat-related deforestation, habitat destruction, heavy water use, and pollution.

Animal Justice is committed both to protecting individual animals from suffering, as well as ensuring wild animals do not disappear forever from our planet. We are thrilled to have worked with our friends at Ecojustice on this important case, and even more pleased by what we’ve achieved together for animals in Ontario. We couldn’t have done it without the generosity of our supporters—please join us in celebrating this incredible victory!

 

Join the Animal Justice mailing list

Yes, I want to stay in touch! 

Animal Justice

13 total views, 0 today

What You Can Do About False Animal Welfare Labels on Meat, Dairy, and Eggs

Animal Justice May 3, 2018

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued a “What We Heard” report about its planned overhaul of Canadian food labelling regulations. What We Heard reports are issued after stakeholders are consulted on proposed policy changes; themes in stakeholder feedback are identified and summarized.

What does food labelling have to do with animal protection, anyway? Meat, dairy and egg packaging often tries to present products as animal-friendly, using terms like “free range,” “cage-free,” “grass-fed” and “family farm.” These labels suggest to consumers that animals were raised in a certain way and may convince them to buy or even pay more for animal products with these labels.

If labelling laws are lax, there is no incentive for producers to improve conditions for animals, because they can mislead consumers instead of making actual changes. In addition, consumers who care about animals may be led to believe that so-called humane agriculture is kind for animals. The truth is that most consumers believe conditions for animals are much better than they actually are.

Now, the CFIA wants to make labelling regulations even weaker than they already are. It wants to make animal welfare and other so-called “consumer values” claims its lowest enforcement priority. Instead of proactively defining and standardizing claims about how farmed animals are treated, the CFIA thinks consumers should be forced to contact companies themselves to find out what their animal welfare claims mean.

But consumers have no way of verifying information provided by companies. Meanwhile, companies stand to benefit financially from misleading consumers.

Animal Justice participated in the CFIA’s labelling consultation. We told them that animal farming lacks transparency, that government must ensure consumers can make informed choices, that animal welfare claims must be regulated, and that regulation is the responsibility of government, not consumers or industry.

We also mobilized Canadians to take action, guiding you through the online feedback process.

It seems that our concerns have been heard: in its What We Heard report, the CFIA wrote:
“Many questioned how the model would achieve a consistent approach regarding the meaning of claims or criteria for making claims.”
“Some consumers and consumer associations thought they may not have the resources (e.g. time, influence, money, knowledge, education, access to information, etc.) to fulfill their role as part of this model. There were concerns that if this is the case, it could become “buyer beware” in the marketplace.”
“Stakeholders stressed the role of government in providing guidance on how to avoid misleading claims.”
“Effective enforcement was mentioned as critical to the success of the model and to avoiding consumer deception when CFIA intervention is needed.”

Unfortunately, however, the CFIA also noted that 84 percent of stakeholders were in favour of the proposed policy changes. Not surprisingly, support was greater among industry than consumers.

What can you do?

The CFIA has correctly identified the concerns with loosening labelling regulations. Now, they need to act on them. Tell the CFIA to crack down on misleading labelling by signing our petition!

 

Join the Animal Justice mailing list

Yes, I want to stay in touch! 

Photo: Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

Animal Justice

16 total views, 1 today

Animal Justice Will Intervene in Lawsuit Challenging Ontario Animal Protection Laws

Animal Justice April 23, 2018

PERTH—National animal law non-profit Animal Justice has been granted intervener status in a lawsuit that attempts to strike down key aspects of provincial animal welfare laws and their enforcement.

The case, Bogaerts v. Attorney General of Ontario, is a constitutional challenge to Ontario’s provincial animal welfare legislation and its enforcement. Specifically, the applicant is asking the court to rule that:

  • granting police powers to the Ontario SPCA, a private charity, violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms because the Ontario SPCA is not subject to transparency, oversight, and accountability measures that apply to other law enforcement agencies;
  • search and seizure powers used to protect animals and investigate animal welfare offences are too broad, violate the Charter, and should be struck down; and
  • animal protection offences in provincial law are criminal in nature and fall outside provincial powers, thus unlawfully intruding on federal jurisdiction.

“This case could weaken protections for millions of animals in Ontario—not just family pets like cats and dogs, but also animals confined in farms, fur farms, zoos, and aquariums,” said Camille Labchuk, lawyer and executive director of Animal Justice. “It could also have national ramifications, potentially affecting the validity of animal protection laws and enforcement in other provinces. Animal Justice will be there to ensure the animals and their interests are represented in court.”

Animal Justice will argue that animals must be protected to the maximum extent possible under the law. To that end, Animal Justice shares many of the applicant’s concerns over the transparency, oversight, and accountability of animal law enforcement. However, Animal Justice believes that broad search and seizure powers are necessary in the unique context of protecting animals, who are often kept behind closed doors and cannot report illegal abuse themselves.

The case is scheduled to be heard in the Superior Court of Justice in Perth, Ontario on Wednesday, May 16. Animal Justice is represented by lawyers Arden Beddoes of Arvay Finlay LLP, and Benjamin Oliphant of Gall Legge Grant Zwack LLP.

-30-

More information about Bogaerts v Attorney General of Ontario is available on a website maintained by the applicant, found here.

For more information, contact:

Camille Labchuk
Executive Director
camille@animaljustice.ca

 

Join the Animal Justice mailing list

Yes, I want to stay in touch! 

Animal Justice

21 total views, 0 today

Page 1 of 151 2 3 15

Article Categories

Article Archives

Who's Online

  • 0 Members.
  • 6 Guests.